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Task Analysis (TA)

Task analysis (TA) is the process of breaking a skill into smaller, more manageable steps in order to teach the skill.

Description

Task analysis (TA) is the process of breaking a skill into smaller, more manageable steps in order to teach the skill. The learner can be taught to perform individual steps of the chain until the entire skill is mastered (also called “chaining”). Other practices, such as reinforcement, video modeling, or time delay, should also be used to facilitate learning the smaller steps. As the smaller steps are mastered, the learner becomes more and more independent in his or her ability to perform the larger skill.

TA meets evidence-based criteria with 8 single-case design studies. According to the evidence-based studies, this intervention has been effective for preschoolers (age 3–5 years) to middle school-age learners (12–14 years) with ASD. TA can be used effectively to address social, communication, joint attention, academic, motor, and adaptive skills.

Brief adapted from

Fleury,V. P. (2013). Task analysis (TA) fact sheet. Chapel Hill, NC: The University of North Carolina, Frank Porter Graham Child Development Institute, The National Professional Development Center on Autism Spectrum Disorders.

Franzone, E. (2009). Overview of task analysis. Madison, WI: National Professional Development Center on Autism Spectrum Disorders, Waisman Center, University of Wisconsin.

RESEARCH SUMMARY

Ages (yrs) Skills Settings Outcome
3-18 Academic, social, communication, self-help, behavior Home, school, clinic
The information found in the Research Summary table is updated yearly following a literature review of new research and this age range reflects information from this review.

Outcomes:     Evidence-based     Emerging     No evidence     Comprehensive

Steps for Implementation

 

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