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Pervasive Developmental Disorder Behavior Inventory (PDDBI)

The Pervasive Developmental Disorder Behavior Inventory (PDDBI; Cohen & Sudhalter, 2005) is an age-normed instrument that assesses problem behaviors of children ages 2 to 12 years with pervasive developmental disorders (PDD) (classical AU, AS, PDD-NOS [pervasive developmental disorders–not otherwise specified], or childhood disintegrative disorder) as defined by the DSM-IV.

Overview

One of the main purposes of this tool is to assess the effectiveness of treatments for children with PDD in terms of Response to Interventions (RTI). Both teacher and parent rating forms are available with standard and extended formats, consisting of 124 or 180–188 items. Rated by parents or teachers, the PDDBI measures adaptive and maladaptive behaviors and can be useful for interventions to improve adaptive social and language skills in social contexts.

Problem behaviors measured include stereotyped behaviors, fears, aggression, social interaction deficits, and aberrant language associated with children with PDD having lower or high-functioning skills. The scale may also be used to differentiate AU from other conditions. Two forms for the teacher and parent consist of six domains (the extended forms measure 10 domains): Approach/Withdrawal Problems, Sensory/Perceptual Approach, Ritualisms/Resistance to Change, Social Pragmatic Problems, Semantic Pragmatic Problems, Arousal Regulation Problems (extended form), Specific Fears (extended form), Aggressiveness (extended form), Receptive/Expressive Social Communication Abilities, Social Approach Behaviors, Expressive Language, Learning, Memory, and Receptive Language (extended form). Each item is rated on a Likert scale, from “Never” to “Often/Typically.”

Summary

Author (yr) Age Range (yrs) Method of Administration/Format Approx. Time to Administer Subscales
Pervasive Developmental Disorder Behavior Inventory (PDDBI) Cohen & Sudhalter (2005) 2-12

Parent Form: 124–188 Items, Teacher Form: 124–180 items

Individually administered, norm-referenced measure of problem behaviors and appropriate social communication behaviors

Teacher and parent rating forms with standard and extended formats. Two conceptual domains (Approach/Withdrawal and Social Communication Skills)

Yields composite scores for Approach/Withdrawal Problems, Repetitive, Ritualistic and Pragmatic Problems, Receptive/Expressive Social Communication Skills, Expressive Social Communication Skills, and Autism

20–30 min. (standard form) 30–45 min. (extended form)

Approach/Withdrawal Problems, Sensory/Perceptual Approach, Ritualisms/Resistance to Change, Social Pragmatic Problems, Semantic Pragmatic Problems, Arousal Regulation Problems (extended form), Specific Fears (extended form), Aggressiveness (extended form), Receptive/Expressive Social Communication Abilities, Social Approach Behaviors, Expressive Language, Learning, Memory, and Receptive Language (extended form)

Availability: Psychological Assessment Resources, http://bit.ly/1J1vG0i

Research

Author (yr) Sample Size Topic(s) Addressed Outcome
McMorris & Perry (2014). 40 - Age Range: 3-7 (years) Criterion-related validity

Convergent validity: Two PDBI adaptive scales were correlated with the Mullen and the Vineland-II (correlations ranged from .53-.76 p < .01 for Expressive Communication Abilities Composite and .55-.77, p < .01 for the Receptive/Expressive Social Communication Abilities Composite).

Divergent validity: Scores on the PDDBI were significantly correlated with the Externalizing subscale of the Vineland-II, such that children with higher PDDBI adaptive scores displayed more externalizing behavior problems (r =.44, p <.01 for Expressive Communication Abilities Composite and r = .43, p < .01 for the Receptive/Expressive Social Communication Abilities Composite).

Scores on the PDDBI were significantly correlated with the CARS total score, such that students with higher autism severity on the CARS showed lower PDDBI adaptive scores (r = -.48, p <.01 for Expressive Communication Abilities Composite and r = -.51, p <.01 or the Receptive/Expressive Social Communication Abilities Composite)

Convergent validity: Results were mixed. Moderately significant correlations were found between the PDDBI and Vineland-II maladaptive scores; however, poor convergent validity was found when examining the low correlations between sections of the PDDBI and the CARS.

Author (yr) Sample Size Topic(s) Addressed Outcome
Reel, Lecavalier, Butter, & Mulick (2012). 84 - Age Range: 3-12 (years) Validity

This study examined whether the PDDBI could be used as a diagnostic tool. Findings were poor.

Sensitivity = .74

Specificity = .62

Efficiency = .68

More than 50% of the non-ASD sample received scores suggestive of ASD. Researchers concluded that the PDDBI should not be used for diagnostic screening of ASD.

Author (yr) Sample Size Topic(s) Addressed Outcome
Cohen, Schmidt-Lackner, Romanczyk, & Sudhalter (2003). 311 - Age Range: 1-17 (years) Reliability Validity

Results discussed in narrative above.

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